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Wallaman Falls, Girringun National Park

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by Cris (subscribe)
I am an Organiser of the Group Hiking South East Qld and More on Meetup. Visit the website at https://www.meetup.com/HikingInSEQLDandMore/ is free to join all the activities posted on the hiking group.
Published April 22nd 2021
Spectacular Waterfall in Girringun National Park
Located in Girringun National Park, Wallaman Falls is the highest, permanent, single-drop waterfall in Australia. Wallaman Falls is part of the Wet Tropics World Heritage Area, home to some of the oldest rainforests on earth and many endangered plants and animals.

Stony Creek plunges 268 metres in a clear single-drop creating a cloud of mist, which often produces many rainbows on sunny days.

Wallaman Falls, Girringun National Park, UNESCO's World Heritage, Djyinda walk, Warrgamaygan Aboriginal people. 'Nginba Warrgamaygan Ngarji, Wet Tropics World Heritage Area, Cassowaries, Ingham, Sugar cane fields, Cattle
Wallaman Falls from the lookout. Photo by Author.


Wallaman Falls, Hinchinbrook, is about 1 hour (52km) west of Ingham. Drive on Wallaman Falls Rd and then turn right into Lookout Rd. At the end of Lookout Rd, there is a carpark.

Wallaman Falls, Girringun National Park, UNESCO's World Heritage, Djyinda walk, Warrgamaygan Aboriginal people. 'Nginba Warrgamaygan Ngarji, Wet Tropics World Heritage Area, Cassowaries, Ingham, Sugar cane fields, Cattle
Height of the falls 269m; pool depth below 20m; height above sea level 540 m. Photo by Author.


A steep trail takes you to the base of the waterfall. Djyinda walk is 3.2 km return allow 2 hrs walking time. Grade: moderate, meaning there is a steep descend and ascend, the track is rugged, may be muddy and slippery. You need a certain level of fitness to cope with the steepness of the track. The Djyinda (pronounced 'Yin-da' and meaning falls or also called Jinda Walk) walk begins 300 m from Wallaman Falls lookout and ends at the base of the falls.

Wallaman Falls, Girringun National Park, UNESCO's World Heritage, Djyinda walk, Warrgamaygan Aboriginal people. 'Nginba Warrgamaygan Ngarji, Wet Tropics World Heritage Area, Cassowaries, Ingham, Sugar cane fields, Cattle
Views from the lookout. Photo by Author.


Wallaman Falls, Girringun National Park, UNESCO's World Heritage, Djyinda walk, Warrgamaygan Aboriginal people. 'Nginba Warrgamaygan Ngarji, Wet Tropics World Heritage Area, Cassowaries, Ingham, Sugar cane fields, Cattle
A butterfly taking a break on the Xanthorrhoea tree. Photo by Author.


Wallaman Falls, Girringun National Park, UNESCO's World Heritage, Djyinda walk, Warrgamaygan Aboriginal people. 'Nginba Warrgamaygan Ngarji, Wet Tropics World Heritage Area, Cassowaries, Ingham, Sugar cane fields, Cattle
Descending the trail. Photo by Author.


Wallaman Falls, Girringun National Park, UNESCO's World Heritage, Djyinda walk, Warrgamaygan Aboriginal people. 'Nginba Warrgamaygan Ngarji, Wet Tropics World Heritage Area, Cassowaries, Ingham, Sugar cane fields, Cattle
There are stairs on the track. Photo by Author.


Wallaman Falls, Girringun National Park, UNESCO's World Heritage, Djyinda walk, Warrgamaygan Aboriginal people. 'Nginba Warrgamaygan Ngarji, Wet Tropics World Heritage Area, Cassowaries, Ingham, Sugar cane fields, Cattle
An aspect of the trail. Photo by Author.


Wallaman Falls, Girringun National Park, UNESCO's World Heritage, Djyinda walk, Warrgamaygan Aboriginal people. 'Nginba Warrgamaygan Ngarji, Wet Tropics World Heritage Area, Cassowaries, Ingham, Sugar cane fields, Cattle
The trail is rugged and may be muddy and slippery. Photo by Author.


At the base of the waterfall, there is a lookout where you can safely enjoy the waterfall. You can walk to the pool but there are big boulders and very slippery rocks. If you want to swim, make sure you don't have any chemicals on you such as creams, sunscreen and deodorants which pollute the waters. Stay away from the waterfall, where the water crashes on the rocks, since it may carry down to the pool logs and other objects.

Wallaman Falls, Girringun National Park, UNESCO's World Heritage, Djyinda walk, Warrgamaygan Aboriginal people. 'Nginba Warrgamaygan Ngarji, Wet Tropics World Heritage Area, Cassowaries, Ingham, Sugar cane fields, Cattle
The mist at the base of the waterfall around the boulders. Photo by Author.


Wallaman Falls, Girringun National Park, UNESCO's World Heritage, Djyinda walk, Warrgamaygan Aboriginal people. 'Nginba Warrgamaygan Ngarji, Wet Tropics World Heritage Area, Cassowaries, Ingham, Sugar cane fields, Cattle
The rocks are very slippery, take lots of care if you want to walk close to the pool. Photo by Author.


Wallaman Falls, Girringun National Park, UNESCO's World Heritage, Djyinda walk, Warrgamaygan Aboriginal people. 'Nginba Warrgamaygan Ngarji, Wet Tropics World Heritage Area, Cassowaries, Ingham, Sugar cane fields, Cattle
Near the base of the fall. Photo by Author.


Wallaman Falls, Girringun National Park, UNESCO's World Heritage, Djyinda walk, Warrgamaygan Aboriginal people. 'Nginba Warrgamaygan Ngarji, Wet Tropics World Heritage Area, Cassowaries, Ingham, Sugar cane fields, Cattle
Near the base of the fall. Photo by Author.


Wallaman Falls, Girringun National Park, UNESCO's World Heritage, Djyinda walk, Warrgamaygan Aboriginal people. 'Nginba Warrgamaygan Ngarji, Wet Tropics World Heritage Area, Cassowaries, Ingham, Sugar cane fields, Cattle
Wallaman Falls from the base. Photo by Author.


A complicated beginning
"The beginnings of Wallaman Falls are anything but humble. Several major geological events created the landscape that you see today. About 50 million years ago, movements of the Earth's crust formed the edge of the continent that lies against the Coral Sea and the present-day landforms began to form. An earlier Herbert River flowed the west. It is not known when it reached its present east flowing course" - from the informative board.

A special place
"The Wallaman Falls Section of Girringun National Park forms part of the Wet Tropics World Heritage Area. It boasts spectacular scenery and an array of plant and animal life. Around the falls, you can discover some of the region's diverse landscapes as open forest transforms into the rainforest. The creeks and rivers are home to platypus, eastern water dragons and saw-shelled turtles. If you are lucky, you might catch a glimpse of the reclusive musky rat-kangaroo or the endangered southern cassowary" - from the informative board.

I visited Wallaman Falls in April and it was a very warm day, 35 degrees Celsius. We started to drive from the town of Ingham. It was an interesting drive, with cattle on the road and lots of sugar cane fields.

Wallaman Falls, Girringun National Park, UNESCO's World Heritage, Djyinda walk, Warrgamaygan Aboriginal people. 'Nginba Warrgamaygan Ngarji, Wet Tropics World Heritage Area, Cassowaries, Ingham, Sugar cane fields, Cattle
Cattle say hello to us. Photo by Author.


Wallaman Falls, Girringun National Park, UNESCO's World Heritage, Djyinda walk, Warrgamaygan Aboriginal people. 'Nginba Warrgamaygan Ngarji, Wet Tropics World Heritage Area, Cassowaries, Ingham, Sugar cane fields, Cattle
Extensive fields with sugar cane. Photo by Author.


Cattle on the side of the road placidly digesting their food.

Wallaman Falls, Girringun National Park, UNESCO's World Heritage, Djyinda walk, Warrgamaygan Aboriginal people. 'Nginba Warrgamaygan Ngarji, Wet Tropics World Heritage Area, Cassowaries, Ingham, Sugar cane fields, Cattle
Cattle on the side of the road. Photo by Author.


It is very common to see many termite mounds in the fields.

Wallaman Falls, Girringun National Park, UNESCO's World Heritage, Djyinda walk, Warrgamaygan Aboriginal people. 'Nginba Warrgamaygan Ngarji, Wet Tropics World Heritage Area, Cassowaries, Ingham, Sugar cane fields, Cattle
A termite hive on the field. The termite mounds are a very common view in the fields. Photo by Author.


Along the winding road to Wallaman Falls, there is a lookout with great views over the mountains and valley around.

Wallaman Falls, Girringun National Park, UNESCO's World Heritage, Djyinda walk, Warrgamaygan Aboriginal people. 'Nginba Warrgamaygan Ngarji, Wet Tropics World Heritage Area, Cassowaries, Ingham, Sugar cane fields, Cattle
View from the lookout on Wallaman Falls Rd. Photo by Author.


Wallaman Falls, Girringun National Park, UNESCO's World Heritage, Djyinda walk, Warrgamaygan Aboriginal people. 'Nginba Warrgamaygan Ngarji, Wet Tropics World Heritage Area, Cassowaries, Ingham, Sugar cane fields, Cattle
There are few signs warning about cassowaries on the road. Photo by Author.


At the end of Lookout Rd, there is carpark available. From the lookout, you can admire the waterfall tumbling down on the rocks beneath.

Wallaman Falls, Girringun National Park, UNESCO's World Heritage, Djyinda walk, Warrgamaygan Aboriginal people. 'Nginba Warrgamaygan Ngarji, Wet Tropics World Heritage Area, Cassowaries, Ingham, Sugar cane fields, Cattle
The spectacular Wallaman Falls . Photo by Author.


Stop at Ingham to grab some goodies to enjoy after the hike. At the lookout, there is also a picnic spot with benches and tables.

Wallaman Falls, Girringun National Park, UNESCO's World Heritage, Djyinda walk, Warrgamaygan Aboriginal people. 'Nginba Warrgamaygan Ngarji, Wet Tropics World Heritage Area, Cassowaries, Ingham, Sugar cane fields, Cattle
Flower on the Jinda Track. Photo by Author.


Wallaman Falls, Girringun National Park, UNESCO's World Heritage, Djyinda walk, Warrgamaygan Aboriginal people. 'Nginba Warrgamaygan Ngarji, Wet Tropics World Heritage Area, Cassowaries, Ingham, Sugar cane fields, Cattle
Flowers on the trail. Photo by Author.


Along the trail is possible to see stinging trees. They are native plants and a very important contributor to the ecology of the environment.

The leaves, stems and fruits of the stinging trees are covered with tiny, silica hairs that inject neurotoxins. The sting is searingly painful and symptoms can persist for several weeks.

Dead stinging trees are also dangerous. If disturbed they release a cloud of stinging heirs, which can cause problems if inhaled. Dead leaves will also sting if handled.

The stinging tree grows in the area in the forest where a tree has fallen and the sunlight can get through the dense canopy. The stinging trees can grow to be tall and big trees.

Wallaman Falls, Girringun National Park, UNESCO's World Heritage, Djyinda walk, Warrgamaygan Aboriginal people. 'Nginba Warrgamaygan Ngarji, Wet Tropics World Heritage Area, Cassowaries, Ingham, Sugar cane fields, Cattle, Wallaman Falls Lookout, Stinging Tree,
Stinging tree. Photo by Author.


Bring a medium day backpack with lots of water, especially if it's a hot day, 2.5 litres of water and snacks.

Put in your backpack a first aid kit. Pack a raincoat, torch, tissues and phone.

You can bring electrolytes to dissolve in water to compensate for the loss through perspiration.

Walk with family, friends or in a group. Never alone!

Long trousers and a shirt with long sleeves are preferable, hiking ankle supportive boots are strongly recommended, hat, gloves, walking poles if you like to use them.

The day prior to the hike, make sure to check the weather website: www.bom.gov.au

The Park Alerts: https://parks.des.qld.gov.au/parks/girringun

And the Road Conditions: https://qldtraffic.qld.gov.au
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Where: Lookout Rd, Wallaman QLD 4850
Your Comment
I thoroughly enjoyed this presentation.
by T. A. Rose (score: 2|256) 5 days ago
Another great article about a great location. It's nice to see different parts of our great country without leaving home.
by Neil Follett (score: 3|2276) 16 days ago
Thanks for the interesting article and great pics. Cheers.
by telor (score: 1|18) 11 days ago
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