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Velma Grove, Ringwood East

Home > Melbourne > Free | Outdoor | Walks
by Neil Follett (subscribe)
I'm a retired photographer living in Lilydale mainly researching and writing on Australian aviation history. Now writing more on general subjects.
Published September 14th 2022
Look for the Blushing Bride
Velma Grove is only a short 600 metre walk but it offers a visual bonanza of floral beauty.

Velma Grove.
Velma Grove.

Not many gardens feature magnolia trees but those that do stand out at this time of the year as the flowers go from bud to flower before the leaves arrive.

Magnolia
Magnolia bloom.

Many grevilleas are appearing in numbers and various hues. Some bottlebrush bushes were also flowering.

Grevilleas
The many hues of grevilleas.


Bottle brush.
Bottle brush bushes are always attractive.

Also very numerous are daisies. Almost every garden has some. I suspect that many are seeded from neighbouring gardens. This aspect is reinforced when daisies appear among other plants.

daisies
Daisy bushes.


daisies
Beautiful enmase


daisies
Large patches are colourful.

Aeonium and agave plants are becoming very popular as they are extremely low maintenance plants. Euphorbia plants are not appealing until closely inspected.

Aeonium & agave.
Aeonium & agave plants.


Euphorbia.
Euphorbia bush.

The only bird observed on this walk was a single magpie.

magpie
The only magpie seen.

Finding a new plant is always exciting and a blushing bride fitted that description. It is endemic to South Africa and a member of the protea family.

Blushing bride.
Blushing bride.

A lovely rose was the yellow Lady Banks rose. Another lovely rose was a pink variety, a mauve periwinkle, a white convolvulus and a pink mellow flower - all attracted attention.

Lady Banks rose.
Lady Banks rose.


rose, periwinkle, convolvulas and mellow flower.
Rose, periwinkle, convolvulas and mellow flower.

A camellia tree and a rhododendron tree both exhibited bright flowers.

Camellia & rhododendron trees.
Camellia tree.


rhododendrons
Rhododendrons.

Only two garden lamps were seen. A long abandoned bear was wedged tightly in the fork of a tree. I wasn't sure if the watering can was an ornament or still in use.

Garden lamps.
Garden lamps.


Bear & watering can.
Abandoned bear and watering can.

Two of the extensive range of salvia plants were seen as were a couple of honeysuckle vines with their red flowers.

salvia
Salvias.


Honeysuckle.
Honey suckle flowers.

A crab apple tree was full of blossoms, well on the way to producing crab apples.

crab apple blossom
Crab apple tree.

When sunlight turns to overcast skies, yellow flowers stand out. A bitoubush, a broom bush and several daffodils were easy to see.

Yellow bushes and flowers.
Bitoubush, broom and daffodil.

Velma Grove is a well-established street and was home to a variety of fences. Picket and a very rural looking post and rail were two. A recessed lychgate looked nice as did a stone wall and a metal mosaic hanging on a brick wall.



Lych gate & picket fence, stone wall and mosaic.
Lych gate & picket fence, stone wall and mosaic.

A mint bush and a marmalade bush sounded very edible.

Mint bush and marmalade bush.
Mint bush and marmalade bush.

A patch of lavender was an attraction to bees. Manuka blossoms were very colourful as were the trumpet like blooms of a red floropontio bush which is a native of South America, and endemic to the Andes Mountains.

Bee on lavender, manuka blossoms and red floropintio.
Bee on lavender, manuka blossoms and red floropintio.

A lilac hibiscus and a tree dahlia were a duo of similar hues. A long leaf wax plant was playing host to a passing bee.

Lilac hibiscus & tree dahlia.
Lilac hibiscus & tree dahlia.

Not seen much these days was a single carnation flower, once a popular garden flower.

carnations
Carnation.

If you like looking at a large variety of flora, this street walk is for you.







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Why? It's a floral bonanza.
When: anytime
Where: Velma Grove, Ringwood East.
Cost: Free
Your Comment
I wonder if anybody else pays the streets they walk in asuch attention as you do.
by Gayle Beveridge (score: 3|9742) 12 days ago
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