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The Inbetweeners Movie - Film Review

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Published September 29th 2013
Sun, Sea, Sex, Booze and Sex

The Inbetweeners was a hit for three series on UK's Channel Four, featuring four hapless teenagers, Jay, Simon, Neil, and Will. They embark on many perils of high school life: bullying, failed relationships, peer pressure, and "fitting in".

Transferred to the big screen for the first time, their adventures have moved beyond the confines of a half-hour sitcom format into a 90 minute movie length romp.

School is over - time for the lads to hit their gap year on one of Greece's densely populated nightlife-packed tourism islands to attempt, in vain, to "pull some vag."

Each one of our protagonists is a tragedy case in their own way. Poor uptight public school boy Will McKenzie (Simon Bird) must face his lack of social skills when he takes a shine to fellow holiday maker, the plucky Alison, being the last of the gang to lose his "V-plates".

Jay's (James Buckley) shallow and hedonistic view of the boy's holiday certainly clashes with Will's demands to see Ancient Greek ruins. ("You can see those anywhere," quips the gormless Neil). Our favourite sex-pest is searching the highs and lows of every night club to try and "pick up some gash", whilst contending with the fact his cockiness over-compensates for his lack of experience with life, and of course, women!

Simon (Joe Thomas), the hopeless romantic, somehow miraculously ends up with the girl of his dreams between the ending of the TV series and the movie. Even though he was supposedly moving to Wales, as a point of ending the series in the first place, this is brushed over and dealt with incredibly quickly. In order to get his ex Carly (Emily Head) out of his system, his holiday is one of forgetting and moving on... that is, until a mix-up that involved Neil asking her and her friends where they were planning their holidays creates an awkward and forced reunion.


Talking about Neil (Blake Harrison), well... he has always been the character with the least dimensions to his name, and as a man of few words and no real logic he has no real character development as such. Which is not such a bad thing, as his intelligence-void, moronic remarks always make for good light comic relief.

The film culminates in a boat party where each of our four members conveniently ends up with the matching four girls they met on holiday earlier in the film. It all seems a bit of a convenient end for our four lovable losers. It's great to see them have a satisfactory conclusion, a round off of their individual stories, but what the TV series thrived off of was the farcical,embarrassing elements of the script where essentially "nothing goes right".

All in all a more mainstream incarnation, obviously marketed for those who have not had the pleasure of enjoying the TV series, as well as for the die hard fans. It's an interesting 90 minutes,but the TV series is hard to beat!
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