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5 More Public Transport Accessible Hikes

Home > Brisbane > Adventure | Lists | National Parks | Walks
by Roy Chambers (subscribe)
Lover of all things interesting and new
Published May 29th 2016
All these hikes can be easily accessed by Public Transport
5 More Public Transport Accessible Hikes

There are many great hikes near Brisbane and around South East Queensland. For anyone trying to get to a hike without a car though, it can be very frustrating. I have previously listed 5 great public transport accessible hikes;here are 5 more.

Brisbane's public transport network can take you to some interesting hikes
Brisbane's public transport network can take you to some interesting hikes


These hikes vary from local little bushland walks to rugged hikes along unsigned tracks with places to camp overnight. All are accessible with your go card.

Dularcha National Park

This hike isn't just accessible by public transportation, taking the train is actually part of the experience. The Dularcha National Park lies between the towns of Landsborough and Mooloolah. Until recently it was a State Forest, so it is still open to horse riders and mountain bikers.

Approaching the train tunnel in Dularcha National Park
Approaching the train tunnel in Dularcha National Park


The primary feature that makes this little National Park worth visiting is the 100 year old rail tunnel that was part of the original rail line. The tunnel is no longer in use as the track now diverts around this section, but you can still walk through the tunnel.

Inside the train tunnel
Inside the train tunnel


This is a destination that is popular with rail enthusiasts. Not only can you take the train here, but really, you should take the train here. Often the best way is to take the train to Landsborough and walk through the tunnel until you exit at Mooloolah. If you drove here, you can take the train back to Landsborough or, if you took the train here, take it all the way back to Brisbane.

Bribie Island

Bribie Island is a great place to visit and while you can drive there, you can also take the bus. Even better there are buses to either end of what is arguably the best beach walk in South East Queensland.

Red Beach on Bribie Island
Red Beach on Bribie Island


The 640 bus runs from Cabootulture Station to the Island with stops at Bongaree on the Pumicestone Passage side of the island, and Woorim on the other. Both places are little villages with cafes, restaurants, bars and shops.

The bridge to Bribie Island
The bridge to Bribie Island


The beach walk starts at Bongaree and goes about 8 kms around the end of the island along Red Beach. This beach is mostly wide sandy beach that is lined by bushland. There are dirt roads leading to various beach access points; you will see people around each of these access point. However for most of the walk you will not see many people. If fact for some of the walk, you won't see anyone at all.

The Bongaree Jetty is where the hike starts
The Bongaree Jetty is where the hike starts


The initial part of the walk is along the Pumicestone Passage foreshore, however you quickly end up on the beach. It is a good idea to take off your shoes once you hit the sand.

Walking on Red Beach
Walking on Red Beach


The walk ends at Woorim. You will see the surf life saving flags on the beach and you know you have arrived. Woorim has the best swimming beach on Bribie. It is also a great place for lunch. Afterwards you can take the bus back to Bongaree or straight back to Caboolutre. You can also walk back to Bongaree via the path beside the road. Most of this path is lined by bushland so it doesn't feel like you are walking by a road.

Woorim has a patrolled beach
Woorim has a patrolled beach


Mt Gravatt and Toohey Forest Conservation Park

Griffith University is flanked by two bushland reserves which include Mt Gravatt and Toohey's Forest. While Tooheys Forest is larger, Mt Gravatt is a better workout and provides great views. There is also a Cafe on the top of Mt Gravatt. It is usually ideal to walk through Toohey's forest to Mt Gravatt.

The Mt Gravatt Summit
The Mt Gravatt Summit


For a decent hike, take the 120 bus that drops you off just before or just after Toohey Forest on Toohey Road or 112, 113 or 114 buses that drop you just north of Toohey Forest on Toohey Road. From there follow the tracks that take you through Toohey Forest in the direction of Mt Gravatt. You will have to take the tunnel under the road, then pass through the university and climb the hill. It is not particularly high, so anyone but the most unfit can attempt this.

The path in Tooheys Forest Reserve
The path in Tooheys Forest Reserve


There are also numerous tracks up and around Mt Gravatt. People looking for a work out can head up and down and back up the hill several times. The easiest way is to take one of the many buses that head down the busway and stop at Griffith University.

Brisbane city seen from Mt Gravatt
Brisbane city seen from Mt Gravatt


The Spit at the Gold Coast

The Spit at the Gold Coast is the exact opposite of what most people expect to find on the Gold coast. This wonderful bit of bushland that lines the locals only beaches is rarely visited by tourists, but often eyed by developers as a place to bulldoze for their next mega development.

Gold Coast high rise buildings seen from The Spit
Gold Coast high rise buildings seen from The Spit


The bushland part of the walk starts at Southport Surf Life Saving Club and heads 4.5 kms (9 kms return) up to the end of the spit. There is also parking and a bus stop here and of course it is a great spot to finish the hike as you can pop in for a beer, fish & chips or a steak. You could also extend the walk and start at Surfers Paradise, but that makes the total return walk over 15 kms. Buses don't go to the end of the spit, but the 704 and 705 buses go as far as Seaworld, so you could take the bus from here to avoid having to walk all the way back.

The start of the walk at Main Beach
The start of the walk at Main Beach


The paths through the bushland vary somewhat in how shady they are. As the paths are fairly wide, it is better to go in the early morning or late afternoon to maximise the shade.

Shady paths at The Spit
Shady paths at The Spit


From the bushland there are plenty of paths heading down the the beach. You can do the entire walk along the beach, or pop down and visit the beach, then pop back up again. Most people choose to swim at the little beach at The Spit.

Walking to the beach through the bushland at The Spit
Walking to the beach through the bushland at The Spit


The walk goes all the way out to the very end of The Spit with views across the Gold Coast Seaway to South Stradbroke Island. There is a fish & chip shop here which always has a huge queue on weekends.

The view from the end of the Spit
The view from the end of the Spit


An alternative to hiking is to cycle. You can hire mountain or beach bikes from various shops in Surfers Paradise and cycle up. This can be a much better option even though sometimes your bicycle becomes bogged in the sandy paths.

Cyclists at The Spit
Cyclists at The Spit


Brisbane Forest Park, now part of D'Aguilar National Park

Brisbane Forest Park is now part of D'Aguilar National Park. The Forest Park section links the three dams in the area, Lake Manchester, Gold Creek and Enoggera together and also borders Mt Coot-tha and Mt Nebo. The hiking trails are mostly rugged and unmarked fire trails. These, along with some bush trails, mean that there is a network of trails within the Brisbane City Council area itself where you can do a range of hikes, including overnight hikes. Yes, there are designated camping areas in the forest.

Rugged tracks in D'Aguilar National Park
Rugged tracks in D'Aguilar National Park


Much of this area is adjacent various Brisbane suburbs so there are several places to access the hiking trails. Some of these include the back of Mt Coot-tha and Lake Enoggera. Another good access point is Gold Creek Dam, though the bus does drop you over a kilometre from the dam. This shouldn't be a problem for avid hikers though.

Steep ridge near Lake Manchester
Steep ridge near Lake Manchester


Some day hikes include Enoggera Dam, Gold Creek Dam and the tracks that link the two dams together. While walking around the dams is fairly straightforward, you will need to take topographic maps with you if you plan to walk between them.

Most of the tracks are wide fire trails
Most of the tracks are wide fire trails


A good overnight hike starts at Lake Manchester and ends at Enoggera or Gold Creek Dams with an overnight stay at the Scrub Road bush camp. Unfortunately there is no public transportation to the start of the hike, but you do have easy access to buses at the end. So it is a great hike if you can get someone to drop you off.

Lake Enoggera has the best public transport access for this area
Lake Enoggera has the best public transport access for this area


Alternatively you can hike from Gold Creek Dam up to the Scrub Road bush camp and then back along to Lake Enoggera. As I have already said, there are numerous paths and tracks in this area. A keen hiker could even make there way up to Mt Nebo.
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Why? You can go hiking even if you don't have a car
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