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Mooloolah River National Park - Mooloolah River Section

Home > Sunshine Coast > Animals and Wildlife | Escape the City | National Parks | Outdoor | Walks
by Heath Hewitt (subscribe)
Writer and fitness enthusiast living in beautiful Redcliffe, Queensland.
Published January 5th 2013
So Much To See So Close To Home - You Won't Believe It
Life only seems to get busier the older we get. Work takes up a lot of our time, and whenever we do get some time alone it's hard to get away anywhere. Buy you don't have to go far to get the most out of both the area's natural beauty and your time off. You can find something wonderful around the hustle and bustle of everyday life right around the corner. The Mooloolah River National Park, close to the University of the Sunshine Coast, is right under our noses and it's time you checked it out.

The scribbly gum trees are an awesome sight.
The scribbly gum trees are an awesome sight.


The Mooloolah River National Park is divided into two sections, this one, the Mooloolah River section, and the Jowarra section. This particular part is just 10 minutes drive from the Mooloolaba Esplanade (Best entrance to the park is off Claymore Rd). Out here there's a couple of trails available to walk, each with something on offer.

Behold the bottlebrush.
Behold the bottlebrush.


The Aemula trail (1.3km) passes Wallum banksia woodlands, open forests and heath, Littoralis trail (1.1km) takes higher ground and feature open forests and woodlands and the Melaleuca trail (850m) features casuarina forests with swamp paperbark forest, where bungwall fern grows. There's also a council bikeway, it runs alongside a section of the park featuring tall open forest with scribbly gums, banksia woodlands and low heath. Just remember, tracks that pass through wet heathland are prone to water inundation from January to June—especially during the summer months. Drier winter months are best for walking. That's when I go to the park and let me just remind you to bring some water, because it gets hot out in the open field.

Can you spot the bug?
Can you spot the bug?


Each trail has something different to offer. I took on the Boronia trial (2.4km) most recently and was impressed with the tall scribbly gum Eucalyptus racemosa forest onto a small health plain, across a creek crossing and onto the largest heath plain in the park. It was a great view out there, you could just make out the homes on the hills of Buderim. Reminds you just how close yet so far away you are.

The trees offer plenty of shade.
The trees offer plenty of shade.


The area out here is a great example of nature and how precious it really is. The park's coastal rainforest, melaleuca forests, wallum banksia woodlands, scribbly gum open forests, sedgelands and closed heaths are all threatened regional ecosystems.

It can get quite hot out around the heath with no cover.
It can get quite hot out around the heath with no cover.


Another thing the Mooloolah River National Park proves is that you don't have to go to the zoo to see some wildlife. Out here there's the potential to see eastern grey kangaroos, lace monitors, echidnas, snakes, lizards, dragonflies, butterflies, frogs, spiders and plenty of others. Keep your ears open and you may hear something - mostly the insects in the area, they're particularly noisy.

The colours of the forest brighten up right where a creek passes through. You can't miss it.
The colours of the forest brighten up right where a creek passes through. You can't miss it.


This section of the Mooloolah River National Park proves that you don't have to go far to see great natural sights. It's a great walk to undertake on any weekend. Bring a couple of friends, pack a picnic, and be sure to clean up any mess you leave behind. As always, bring a camera.
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Why? To enjoy that national park experience without the long drive out west. You probably drive by this section of the Mooloolah River National Park every day on way to school or work.
When: Any time you like
Where: Mooloolah River National Park (Off Claymore Rd, Sippy Downs)
Cost: Free
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