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LEGO Pompeii @ Nicholson Museum

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by Geraldine Massey (subscribe)
I'm an experienced corporate communicator and editor with an eye for interesting events and an attachment to my trusty Oxford dictionary.
Event: -
Update June 19th 2014
Please note that this exhibition will not now open until January 2015.

From ashes to LEGO - Pompeii brought to life in FREE display
Following on from the huge success of the LEGO Colosseum and the LEGO Acropolis, Sydney University's Nicholson Museum is sticking with its unique, crowd-pleasing formula for yet another journey to classical antiquity. This time it's Pompeii that will get the full LEGO treatment and be on display from January 2015.

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The giant LEGO Pompeii will be constructed by the man with one of the world's coolest jobs - Ryan McNaught, a.k.a "The Brickman" - one of only thirteen LEGO Certified Professionals in the world. I'm sure it's not all as fun and playful as it seems but getting paid to play with LEGO all day would surely be on the top of a lot of people's lists of ideal jobs.

Never afraid to tackle iconic historical monuments, The Brickman will once again use more than 100,000 LEGO bricks to construct this engineering marvel, which will, like the museum's predecessor LEGO constructions, be a half-and-half display with a cutaway view. You'll see Pompeii half as the ruins that visitors can see today, and half as the bustling, thriving metropolis the city was before its destruction by the eruption of Mt Vesuvius in 79 AD. Original archaeological material direct from Pompeii and the Roman empire will also be on display.

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Look out for McNaught's trademark humourous touches and delicious detail. As an example his LEGO Acropolis, which is still on display at Nicholson Museum until 30th June 2014, features a badly bewigged Tony Mokbel, the Australian criminal who was arrested in Athens in 2008. His 2012 LEGO Colosseum included a very modern Popemobile. One wonders what idiosyncratic inclusions will appear in LEGO Pompeii. Maybe we'll see Pliny The Younger dictating his first hand account of the chaos and destruction from a safe distance, or Pliny The Elder perishing at sea in a heroic, but ultimately futile, attempt to rescue his friends.

What a clever and entertaining way to bring history to life in a way that kids can identify with. People who would not usually venture into Nicholson Museum, the largest museum of antiquities in Australia, come for the LEGO and stay to view the exhibition. They can also check out the museum's fascinating ongoing exhibitions where the stuff of myth and legend comes to life: The Etruscans, Egyptians, gods and mummies, and Tombs, Tells and Temples.

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Detail from the museum's current exhibition; LEGO Acropolis

Exhibition Details

When: The exhibition will open in January 2015. The opening date is yet to be announced. Check the website closer to January for details.
Hours: The museum is open Monday to Friday from 10am to 4.30pm and the first Saturday of each month from 12 noon to 4pm. It is closed every other Saturday, Sundays and public holidays.
Where: Nicholson Museum, The Quadrangle, Sydney University
Cost: Free

Sydney University is also home to the Macleay Museum and University Art Gallery, and entry to both is free.
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Why? History plus LEGO
When: From January 2015
Where: Nicholson Museum, Sydney University
Cost: Free entry
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