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See Kata Tjuta

Home > Uluru > Lookouts | National Parks | Outdoor | Photography | Walks
by Paula McManus (subscribe)
Photography obsessed writer and urban explorer. Lover of nature, art and long weekends. Adelaide, South Australia. https://www.facebook.com/paula.mcmanus1
Published June 1st 2015
The Olgas
While in the Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park, you must take the time to visit Kata Tjuta as well as the more famous Uluru.

Kata Tjuta The Olgas
Kata Tjuta (Špaula mcmanus)


Traditionally Kata Tjuta is known as the "Men's Place" and Uluru is traditionally the "Women's Place".

Kata Tjuta is approximately 55 kilometres from Uluru on a sealed road and a 3 day National Park pass gives you lots of opportunity to see the dome shaped geological wonders as well as the big rock.

Kata Tjuta The Olgas
Kata Tjuta (Špaula mcmanus)


Kata Tjuta means 'many heads' and is as sacred to the indigenous people as Uluru. Mt Olga is nearly 200 metres higher than Uluru at its tallest point.

Kata Tjuta is really beautiful and so very interesting. It's hard to take your eyes of the rock mounds.

Geologically, the history of the area is simply amazing. 500 million years ago there was a inland sea. Kata Tjuta and Uluru are part of that ancient sea bed. Much of the rock is still underground - what we see on the surface is similar to how we see an iceberg.

Kata Tjuta The Olgas
Kata Tjuta (Špaula mcmanus)


Kata Tjuta is a spectacular site and is full of amazing rock formations and wonderful views which can be enjoyed from the walking trails, as well as from the carpark!

The access to Kata Tjuta is different to that of Uluru. You can access Uluru from many different sides and it's possible to walk the whole base. At Kata Tjuta you are restricted to just a couple of entry points.

There are 4 walks to do.

Walpa Gorge Walk:
2.6km return (1 hour). Grade 3 difficulty level. Short steep hills, rough track, no hiking experience required, sign posted and occasional steps.

Valley of the Winds Karu Lookout:
2.2km return (1 hour). Grade 3 difficulty level. Short steep hills, rough track, no hiking experience required, sign posted and occasional steps. Drinking water available at the beginning of the track.

Valley of the Winds Karingana Lookout:
5.4km return (2.5 hours). Grade 4 difficulty level. Very steep, very rough track, some hiking experience required, sign posted and many steps. Track is closed when the temperature reaches 36 degrees Celsius.

Valley of the Winds Full Circuit:
7.4km return (4 hours). Grade 4 difficulty level. Very steep, very rough track, some hiking experience required, sign posted and many steps. Track is closed when the temperature reaches 36 degrees Celsius. Drinking water available half way along the track.

Kata Tjuta The Olgas
Kata Tjuta Valley of the Winds (Špaula mcmanus)


The walking paths are quite uneven and are not an easy walk for those with knee, ankle or back problems. My friend and I did not continue into the Valley of the Winds due to the rocky terrain, the steep climbs and our dodgy knees and ankles. If you'd like to do the walk, perhaps consider bringing a hiking stick with you.

Standing at the entrance to the Valley of the Winds walk it's easy to know why it got it's name. It is incredibly windy there and very very cold. I was there mid-May and the cold and wind just ripped through me. Wearing layers is a good idea.

Kata Tjuta The Olgas
Kata Tjuta (Špaula mcmanus)


Water must be carried at all times while in the park. At least a litre per hour that you are walking. There is drinking water available on the Valley of the Winds walk, but it's best to be completely prepared and take your own, even in the cooler months. Wear good walking shoes, and bring a hat with a fly net. The flies are large in number and can ruin a good day out.

Kata Tjuta The Olgas
Kata Tjuta (Špaula mcmanus)


Overall, Kata Tjuta is fascinating and is definitely worth a visit! For an entirely different view of Kata Tjuta and Uluru, why not take a helicopter flight - I guarantee you it will be a flight you'll never forget!

Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park is open all year round from sunrise to sunset. Actual opening times vary according to the season.

Park entrance fees are $25 per person. Entry for children aged 16 years of age and under is free. The pass gives you access to the park for 3 days and is great value.

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Why? Visit this magnificent World Heritage site
Where: Kata Tjuta
Cost: $25 per person for a 3 day pass, free for children under 16
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