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Jung Sung Contemporary Korean's 2022 Winter Menu

Home > Sydney > Australian Native Food | Dinner | Food and Wine | Lunch | Restaurants
by lilbusgirl (subscribe)
http://3eggsfull.blogspot.com.au/
Event: -
Did you say truffles with lunch?
A short stroll from Central Station, past old haunts taking in the ever-changing streetscape ending at Chippendale's buzzing Kensington precinct, Jung Sung restaurant is an easy find.

As there were a few people waiting for the lift, my dining companion suggested we take the stairs to the restaurant. I thought this was a great idea to keep up my quota of steps for the day. However by the time we got to the top level, my breathing was quite laboured, and the front-of-house staff member was looking a little concerned as I took a few moments to gain my composure. You have been warned that there are a few flights of stairs to climb (I think I may need to include hills in my exercise regime!).

Entering a cosy space with black dining chairs and dark dining tables offset with bronze cutlery, you feel like you have mistakenly stumbled into a secret dining spot. The outdoor dining space looks equally inviting, looking onto the Clare Hotel and the spilling greenery from the vertical gardens of One Central Park - I likened it to a futuristic greenscape cliff.

Korean food, Contemporary Korean, Chippendale, Sydneyeats, fine dining, Sydneyfoodie, Korean fusion, Australian and Korean cuisine, Weekendnote, restaurant review.
Jung Sung Contemporary Korean


I was intrigued by the Contemporary Korean cuisine that Jung Sung is known for. 'Modern and unique understanding of contemporary Korean cuisine with the best seasonal and local produce Australia has to offer.' The concept isn't foreign, however, due to the relative newness of this cuisine, it does raise a few eyebrows.

It has been considered that Korean cuisine is one of the healthiest on earth with dairy being largely absent from the traditional diet and an emphasis on vegetables, seafood, simply cooked meats and an enormous assortment of fermented vegetable kimchi.

The dishes are inspired by Chef Insup Kim's experiences and noting his impressive resume working at Michelin star restaurants in New York, it certainly set high expectations and my curiosity, to see what he would do with combining cultures and cuisines from both Australia and Korea.

On offer for our winter lunch is a 3 course or 5 course lunch with dinner being 6 courses with matching wines. The winter course includes the option of truffles sourced locally from Hartley farm located in the Blue Mountains. Can't get fresher than that and appreciate the heady perfume of the truffle as it's shaved directly onto the plate.

A prompt delivery of an amuse bouche of scallops, creamy chestnut sauce beautifully presented on a bed of rocks and shells arrives, with a petite brioche sandwich of caramelised cabbage and a good sprinkle of truffle begins the meal, certainly setting the scene packing some interesting flavours at the very start.

Korean food, Contemporary Korean, Chippendale, Sydneyeats, fine dining, Sydneyfoodie, Korean fusion, Australian and Korean cuisine, Weekendnote, restaurant review.
Amuse bouche of scallops and brioche

First course is an ample serving of raw Hiramasa Kingfish layered with jewel-like pieces of pomelo underneath, persimmon and chojang (a chilli paste with vinegar), smoked ricotta cheese and burnt gim (Korean paper-thin seaweed) adding a smoky flavour to this dish.

Korean food, Contemporary Korean, Chippendale, Sydneyeats, fine dining, Sydneyfoodie, Korean fusion, Australian and Korean cuisine, Weekendnote, restaurant review.
First course Hiramasa Kingfish

Similarities are shared in the fact that Australia has an amazing quality of Hiramasa Kingfish and that this fish is popular sought after winter dish in Korea. Aged in winter fruit of lime and pomelo for 48hrs before serving raw, each mouthful was perfectly harmonised with the flavours. Yes, I can see how your unique cooking methods unlock those natural flavours of seasonal selected ingredients! I'm liking the play on textures and flavours so far.

We couldn't go past the option of 'Moreton Bay Bug Two Ways' and it is truly a unique experience. Served with deconstructed bibimbap, rice, twice soy marinaded bug, egg textures (boiled white and yolk), and puffed multi-grains (quinoa, buckwheat), micro chives, fresh onion and sesame oil.

Korean food, Contemporary Korean, Chippendale, Sydneyeats, fine dining, Sydneyfoodie, Korean fusion, Australian and Korean cuisine, Weekendnote, restaurant review.
Moreton Bay bug two ways

Jung Sung has managed to stamp their signature with this dish of Korean Bibimbap with soy marinaded bug and house-compressed sesame oil and I approve.

The amount of preparation that is taken to make this dish takes the appreciation to another level; the bug is marinaded twice taking forty-eight hours then poached in brown butter, add the addition of gochujang aioli, crustacean (blue swimmer crab, bug) bisque, and perilla leaves plus the addition of the winter truffle. Each bite was heaven and paired perfectly with the 2020 Colmar Estate Chardonnay. I could have happily just eaten a large bowlful of bibimbap and poached bug and been content, it was that delicious.

Next was the Spanish Mackerel dish. This mackerel is of sashimi-grade, dry-aged for 48 hours grilled over charcoal before being served on the dish with a bubble foam of mandarin juice and pine nut juk (Korean word for porridge or soup) poured at the table. The baby nasturtium leaves, sliced rounds of mackerel with the pickled orange radish was just picture perfect with pops of colours and the taste was similarly sensational. The pickled radish complemented the crispy oily fish and flavours of pine nut juk was subtle with a bite of pepper from the nasturtiums.

Korean food, Contemporary Korean, Chippendale, Sydneyeats, fine dining, Sydneyfoodie, Korean fusion, Australian and Korean cuisine, Weekendnote, restaurant review.
Third course Spanish Mackeral

Banchan (small dishes) are next to be placed on the table which are to accompany the main courses Black Angus beef rib and crispy pork loin. White cabbage, radish kimchi, abalone samjang (dipping sauce) with lettuce and perilla leaves.

Korean food, Contemporary Korean, Chippendale, Sydneyeats, fine dining, Sydneyfoodie, Korean fusion, Australian and Korean cuisine, Weekendnote, restaurant review.
Banchan

The beef short rib called galbi is well known to be one the most popular cuts of beef for barbeque in Korea. At Jung Sung, the highest quality Black Angus beef is marinated with soy sauce, plum extract, and kiwi for 24 hours in the traditional Korean method then simply grilled over charcoal before being served.

The hero of the dish is the beef cheek, braised for 12 hours in pear and red wine liquid which is also served on the same plate draped with pickled radish and beetroot and served with a drizzle of galbi jus. It is rather decadent with the addition of truffle to provide a further enhancement to the flavour of this dish. While I wasn't too sure of the addition of polenta cake and sourdough and almond puree with this dish, it is well matched with a glass of the 2020 Ministry of Clouds Grenache Carignon from McLaren Vale SA.

Korean food, Contemporary Korean, Chippendale, Sydneyeats, fine dining, Sydneyfoodie, Korean fusion, Australian and Korean cuisine, Weekendnote, restaurant review.
Course 4, Black Angus beef and crispy pork loin


The scored pork jowl is juicy served with artichoke puree, sweet parsnip chip sprinkled with Australian macadamia and that fermented capsicum is just the best. Can I please have a bottle of this to take home?

The white cabbage kimchi and radish kimchi is the perfect match as it cuts through the rich flavours of the Black Angus beef rib and cheek and crispy pork loin and jowl.

We're back on familiar territory with the option to wrap. A slice of pork jowl on the perilla leaf, a dab of abalone samjang with a few pieces of radish kimchi wrapped for that one bite. It is supposed to be eaten in one bite as it's considered the height of rudeness to bite into a lettuce parcel. That one bite, that delicious explosion of flavours, that's what it's all about, no explanation required here.

Korean food, Contemporary Korean, Chippendale, Sydneyeats, fine dining, Sydneyfoodie, Korean fusion, Australian and Korean cuisine, Weekendnote, restaurant review.
Making up the perfect mouthful


Coming up to the sweet courses is Jung Sung's signature dessert, the sweet corn dessert. Don't be fooled - it's not corn but pure artistry. This sweet corn lookalike mousse is made of sweet corn and mascarpone mousse, a doenjang (Korean soybean paste) insert, sweet corn sponge cake, soy sauce caramelised pistachios, coconut flakes and pieces of fresh kiwi fruit.

Can you believe that this dessert requires 3 days of preparation?

This dessert dish is a must try, it's not too sweet but a perfect balanced with the flavours of corn, saltiness from the pistachios, the lightness of the mousse and sponge cake and those pieces of kiwi fruit just freshens it all up. Who would of thought corn would be ideal ingredient for dessert, it is one inspired dish.

Is it corn? It looks like corn.


The last course of dessert is tangerine and Yuja sorbet with creamy flourless cream cheesecake. The Yuja is sourced from Jeju Island located on the south coast of Korea where a huge amount of this tangerine is produced. I can attest that this tangerine is a very popular as a dessert in the winter period in Korea. At the markets in Jeju, I remember seeing boxes being purchased of this fruit being purchased which included delivery to Seoul for family members.

A miniature ceramic pot is placed in front of me and the lid lifted to reveal a cheesecake mixed with Australian native wattle seed and a beautiful quenelle of Korean-flavoured citrus sorbet. The tangerine and Yuja sorbet is refreshingly cold and brings nostalgic memories of the Korean winter. The finale is the cream puffs with sesame crust and milk curd served on a bed of red beans, the pastry is light with a delightful savoury sesame note to finish on.

Korean food, Contemporary Korean, Chippendale, Sydneyeats, fine dining, Sydneyfoodie, Korean fusion, Australian and Korean cuisine, Weekendnote, restaurant review.
Dessert course


Chef Insup Kim has ensured his food at Jung Sung is balanced with careful consideration given to temperature, spiciness, colour, texture with its considered presentation. It's a Korean banquet consisting of many dishes cooked in various ways, dry aged, simmered, pan fried, stewed, fermented and raw.

The cornerstone of Korean food is rice and I love his twist of the deconstructed bibimbap. It's refined with each ingredient cooked individually then beautifully arranged in a bowl, then mixed together for the most delicious mix of rice, meat, white and yellow egg strands and sesame oil.

Their creative flair and time-consuming processes ensure a sure-fire admiration of the contemporary flavours using Korean and Australian ingredients and the dishes are a sight to behold.

If you're looking for leisurely lunch with a difference, then Jung Sung is the spot to book now. There's option for 3 courses or 5 courses and for some winter indulgence, then I recommend the addition of truffles and Moreton Bay Bug.

There's a buzz about town, the weekends are looking busy, book yourself an experience as you'll be pleasantly surprised with the flavours of Jung Sung.

It's a homage to the diners and will be a lasting memory, you won't forget in a hurry. Like most things, it takes time for restaurants to distinguish itself from the rest. You heard it here first, contemporary Korean fusing Korean and Australian ingredients is worth the dining experience.

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*lilbusgirl was invited as a guest
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Why? A homage to its diner, Korean Contemporary cuisine is here.
When: Lunch Friday - Sunday 12 - 3.30pm Dinner Wednesday - Sunday 5.30 - 11pm
Phone: 0400 991 011
Where: Level 3, Old Rum Store / 2 - 10 Kensington St. Chippendale NSW 2008
Cost: Winter lunch, 3 course from $88, 5 course from $128
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