Subscribe      List an Event or Business      Invite a Writer      Write for WN      Writers      Other Locations
list an event      1 million Australian readers every month      facebook

A Walk Between Two Brisbane Dams Enoggera Dam to Gold Creek Dam

Home > Brisbane > Animals and Wildlife | Environment | Health and Fitness | Outdoor | Walks
by Roz Glazebrook (subscribe)
I'm a freelance writer living in Brisbane. I love bushwalking, kayaking, wildlife, history and travel.
Published July 11th 2019
An interesting bushwalk
I've walked around Enoggera Reservoir and kayaked on the dam there many times, but until recently I'd never been to Gold Creek Reservoir. I previously wrote about bushwalking around Enoggera Reservoir and the history of that dam here.

Gold Creek Dam Steps
Gold Creek Dam Steps


I recently had the opportunity to walk from Enoggera Dam to Gold Creek dam. It took a bit of organising, including a car shuffle. A group of bushwalkers met at the Gap Park and Ride early on a Sunday morning in June. Five drivers took their cars to the Gold Creek Reservoir car park at Brookfield. They left four cars there, and one driver brought the other four drivers back to the start of our walk at Enoggera Reservoir.

Walking along Forestry Road
Walking along Forestry Road


Soon after we started walking, we had to give way to a large number of trail runners. It was the Fifth Running of the Walkabout Creek Trails Race by the Trail Running Association of Queensland (TRAQ). I didn't envy the runners as they passed us, running up a steep hill close to the Enoggera Dam wall.

Trail runners
Trail runners


After walking a few kilometres around Enoggera Dam, we turned off the main track and headed off on the E Break dirt road. We walked along this road until we got to the junction with South Boundary Road. We then followed South Boundary Road to Gold Creek Road. South Boundary Road is the Southern Boundary of Brisbane Forest Park. It is a combined walk/horse/run and bike path.

Gold Creek Reservoir
Gold Creek Reservoir


Just before we turned off onto the Gold Creek Road track, we saw a log with a sign "Keith's log" on it. I haven't been able to find out who Keith was, so if any readers know please let me know. He might have been a road worker or timberman. Someone has put a shiny new sign next to an older one. I would love to know the story about why that particular log is "Keith's log".

Keith's Log
Keith's Log


The last short bit of our walk was off track along a creek bank. The stone steps of the Gold Creek dam loomed out of the rainforest, looking like something out of an Indiana Jones movie. The dam spillway is a unique design, which has 12 steps. It was the world's first concrete stepped spillway.

Off track by the creek
Off track by the creek


After lunch at the dam wall, three of our group decided to stay resting in the sun. The rest of us set out to walk clockwise around the dam.

Walking across Gold Creek Dam Wall
Walking across Gold Creek Dam Wall


The trail around the dam is approximately 4.5km long. There were a few hilly sections, but nothing really hard. The bushland around Gold Creek Dam is part of Brisbane Forest Park and contains plants and wildlife of regional biodiversity significance. It contains platypus and native fish species in the reservoir.

Gold Creek Dam Track
Gold Creek Dam Track


John Henderson for the Brisbane Board of Waterworks designed the Gold Creek Dam. It was built in 1886 to increase water supply for Brisbane. It was the second dam to be built. The Enoggera Dam was built first in 1866.

Gold Creek Reservoir
Gold Creek Reservoir


In 1928, a tunnel was constructed from Gold Creek to Enoggera Creek and the two reservoirs were operated as a single connected storage. Gold Creek Dam continued to supply water to Enoggera Dam until the pipeline was decommissioned in 1991.

Climbing down Gold Creek Dam
Climbing down Gold Creek Dam


We could hear Bell Minor calls throughout the beautiful green forest on our walk. I used to love hearing these birds, but I found out they are causing damage to forest trees. Linda told me all about Bell Minor Associated Dieback (BMAD). Bell miner associated dieback is spreading through forests on public and private lands from South-East Queensland to Victoria. These forests are regionally and nationally important for plant and animal conservation, tourism, water catchment management, and the production of honey and timber.

Green forest
Green forest


Dieback is a condition in which trees progressively die, from the top downward. It spreads through the leaves and branches and often the whole plant will eventually die. The dieback is strongly associated with sap-feeding insects called psyllids and psyllids are strongly associated with the native bell miner or bellbird.

Bell miners are a natural part of eucalypt forests, and they normally have a minor (and positive) impact on forests. However, bell miner populations have increased in size, and the birds have become more widely distributed and have been implicated in the spread of dieback.

Beside the creek
Beside the creek


A highlight for me was seeing a Stony Creek Frog (Litoria wilcoxii) at the end of the walk as we were walking to the car park. It was sitting beside the creek and I managed to get a photo before it hopped away. It was the first time I had seen one of these beautiful frogs. These ground-dwelling tree frogs found in Eastern Australia can be varied colours from grey to brown. They have a thin, black line running from their snout to their eye, which widens from the eye, and continues uninterrupted until the base of the arm. The frog's groin was yellow with black blotches and the backs of the thighs have a black and yellow pattern.

Stoney Creek Frog
Stoney Creek Frog


We went for coffee and snacks at the Brookfield cafe. After we got back to the Gap Park and Ride I discovered I had left my walking poles back at the dam. I drove all the way back and amazingly, even though there were lots of people around the dam, my poles were still standing up by the tree where I had left them.

Bridge at Gold Creek Reservoir
Bridge near Gold Creek Reservoir


It was a lovely walk and I really enjoyed it. It was filled with an interesting history and lots of wildlife and birds. We walked a total of about 13 kilometres. There was a lot of variety, including forests, rainforest, creeks, dams and reservoirs. It was very pleasant walking along the wide bush forestry roads chatting to each other and listening to the birds.

Walking Group on Boundary Creek Road
Walking Group on Boundary Creek Road


Help us improve  Click here if you liked this article  75
Share: email  facebook  twitter
Why? An interesting bush walk
When: Anytime
Where: Enoggera Dam to Gold Creek Dam
Cost: Free
Your Comment
Great pictures, Roz! Always fabulous to be out and about in nature ...
by Elaine (score: 3|6414) 11 days ago
You certainly are a dedicated walker Roz.
by Gayle Beveridge (score: 3|6529) 10 days ago
I am wondering if you can take your dogs, on leash of course?
by jo.ph (score: 0|5) 7 days ago
The pipeline between the two reservoirs is still there and can be viewed in a couple of places. :)
by motch (score: 1|87) 10 days ago
Featured
Foodi Photoh Classie
Top Events
Popular Articles
Categories
Lists
Questions