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A Directional Walk

Home > Melbourne > Outdoor | Walks
by Neil Follett (subscribe)
I'm a retired photographer living in Lilydale mainly researching and writing on Australian aviation history. Now writing more on general subjects.
Published July 31st 2020
North, South, East or West, take your pick
If you live in suburbia, you can walk to your nearest crossroad and ponder. "Will I go North, South, East or West?" Why not try all four and any in-between.
aerial suburbs
Somewhere in suburbia.


With our travel now restricted, you can start your exercise at your front gate. "Boring," you say. Not so. You may have driven around your neighbourhood hundreds of times but you will never have noticed the myriad of things that attract your eye at walking pace

flowering bush
You won't see this from the car.

The most obvious are colourful flowers. No matter what season it is, there is always an abundance of colour in our neighbour's gardens. You may get some good ideas for your own garden. An added bonus is that you can stop and literally smell the roses.

flowering bush
Such beauty.

My latest walk was in the last trimester of winter and already some spring blossoms were appearing.

red flowers
An early blossom.

An interesting observation I noticed on the walk was many new trees recently planted, within the sounds of a chainsaw cutting down a mature tree on a neighbouring property.

new plantings
Future trees and shrubs.


small tree
A future pine tree.

Trees, being at the large end of flora, can be magnificent specimens to observe and admire.

Norfolk Island pines
Two stately Norfolk Island Pines.


magpie in tree.
Easily seen Magpie.

My walk was around four kilometres and I passed three small parks and reserves. Two had play equipment where both young and old could have a rest.

Reserve
One of the reserves passed.

A neighbourhood walk can be educational. You can read the names of streets you may have driven past many times.

Street sign
You can practice your pronouncing skills

Rather mundane items are letterboxes, but a footpath walk reveals how many different and unusual ones there are and garden ornaments offer another visual experience.

owl
Wouldn't like to meet this on a night walk.

Even on a weekday, many people were pounding the footpaths, many accompanied by their canine friends.

couple walking
Two's company.


Girl walking dog.
Company of a different kind.

Many birds were observed. Several were at ground level, some in trees and many perched on powerlines giving a good view of them.

magpie walking
Why fly when you can walk.


Noisy miner on wire.
High wire act.


crow
An evil eye.

A couple of young lads were giving their bicycles some exercise and it was pleasing to see they were wearing helmets, as a friendly passing 'hello' was exchanged.

boy on bike
Boy cyclist.

You may be able to do some of your shopping as I noticed a bucket of free oranges and a bag of lemons for only $2.00.

oranges
Oranges ...


lemons
.. & lemons.

Rounding one corner as I neared home, I saw a saw hanging from a tree, closer inspection saw the sawyer also in the tree. It was a neighbour, so a socially distanced short conversation took place.

man in tree
A tree change is about to happen.

My four kilometre walk took about one and a half hours of good exercise and it was good exercise as some areas were undulating giving a good cardiovascular workout despite the slow pace.

man & dogs
Dogs also like exploring.

Interesting gardens, colourful plants and flowers, a friendly nod and a muffled good morning to other exercise seekers made for a pleasant journey, almost without leaving home.

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Your Comment
Hello Neil- enjoy your walking stories. The little silvery plant is actually a native- Adenanthos sp. not a pine tree. They have lovely silky soft foliage and people have started using them as Australian Christmas trees when still small in pots fresh from the nursery. Hope you donít mind the info! Cheers Ro
by coora (score: 1|23) 51 days ago
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