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Australia's Top 6 Campsites with a View

Home > Sydney > Camping | Escape the City | Lists | Outdoor | Views
Published August 21st 2014
Stunning natural retreats for a special camping experience
One of the unique experiences that come with travelling in a campervan is that your mode of transport is also essentially a room with a view that changes everyday. Watching a sunrise or sunset from the comfort of your campervan is an incredible opportunity, and with the spectacular Australian landscape as your backdrop, you don't have to go far to find a campground with a stunning sight to wake up to.

For those looking at taking a campervan holiday, here is a selection of the top Australian campsites with a view.

1. Dawsons Spring, NSW

Dawsons Spring is set in the Mount Kaputar National Park, in North-West NSW, between two extinct volcanos. Most of the mountains in this area are ancient lava terraces and offer a number of exciting bushwalking trails. Take in breathtaking scenery of the natural rock and lava formations or challenge yourself with a bike or horse ride through canyons and gorges.

If you are looking for something a little more relaxing, explore the remains of the Aboriginal heritage sites or follow the Kaputar Scenic Drive through 20kms of landscapes sure to impress even the most seasoned traveller.

National Geographic voted Dawson Springs as the campsite with the best panoramic view in Australia, and at only $5AUD per adult per night it's hard to pass up an opportunity for an overnight stay.

kangaroo, australia, nsw, dawsons spring, camp
Dawsons Spring - image from: Image: www.environment.nsw.gov.au


2. Lucky Bay, WA

Situated in Western Australia's Cape Le Grand National Park and overlooking one of Australia's whitest beaches; the Lucky Bay campsite is a slice of paradise. Perfect for campervans, the campground offers easy access, has solar-heated showers and a
barbeque.

Some of the many things you can do at Lucky Bay include, fishing, surfing, four-wheel driving along the beach and wildlife-spotting. You may just catch kangaroos lazing on the beach. Between July and October, migrating whales may be seen from the doorstep of your campervan.

camp, campervan, lucky bay, western australia, wa, australia, beach, coast
Lucky Bay - Image: aussiebudgetcamps.com.au


The site does not take bookings and operates on a first come first served basis. Camping fees and National Park entry fees apply: $11AUD per vehicle to enter the Park and $9AUD per adult per night.

3. Wilkinson's Creek, Mount Kosciuszko, NSW

Although not for the faint-hearted, camping at Mount Kosciuszko can be an incredible experience. Depending on the season, you will need to come fully prepared to brave the elements, preparing for snow, rain, gale force winds and extreme UV levels.

There are however, many reasons why people flock to this particular campsite at all times of the year. The creek itself is in a broad valley, between Mt Kosciuszko and Mt Townsend. You must camp a minimum of 100m from the creek and the area can be subject to westerly winds, but the sunsets from this vantage point are breathtaking. There are no fires allowed, and if you are staying for more than a day or two you are required to move your campsite to minimise damage to the area.

snow, mt kosciusko, snowy mountains, nsw, australia
Mt. Kosciusko


Mount Kosciuszko offers bush walks and ski-runs suited to all skill levels, and also panoramic views of Australia's highest mountain (2228 metres). There are numerous other activities to choose from including kayaking, mountain biking, fishing, rafting or caving. For the less adventurous, the chairlift to the top of the mountain costs $28 per adult one way.

Park access fees vary throughout the year and between the June long weekend to the October long weekend it is $27AUD per vehicle per day; while the rest of the year the price is $16AUD per vehicle per day.

4. Ormiston Gorge, NT

Ormiston Gorge is an oasis set amongst the rocky plains of the Northern Territory, 128km west of Alice Springs. Red rock and eucalypt trees surround a near-permanent water-hole perfect for
swimming.

The photo opportunities are endless from sunrise to sunset, and there is an abundance of wildlife to be seen. There are walking trails and 4WD adventure trails established, and for those in need of a challenge, bicycle tracks through the range. The site is easily reached by campervan and has a limited supply of drinking water, hot shower access and BBQ facilities.

Fires are not permitted, and spaces are limited so arrive early in the morning to secure a spot. Camping fees are currently $10AUD per adult per night.

nt, northern territory, camp, ormiston, gorge
Ormiston Gorge - image: flickr.


5. Devils Marbles, NT

The iconic Devils Marbles (Karlu Karlu) is a stretch of giant granite boulders nearly 400km north of Alice Springs. Camping here is one of the rare chances you will get to sleep next to such a historic, culturally significant site in Australia.

devils marbels, northern territory, central australian desert, dingo, camp, nt
Devils Marbles - image: maiersadventure.blogspot.com.au/


While the area is fully protected and fires are allowed in the fireplaces provided, you should check with the Department of Fire and Emergency Services prior to arriving at camp.

Native wildlife frequent the area so expect to see a lizard or two in your campsite and incredible hiking trails with one of a kind photo opportunities are on offer. Camping will cost $3.30AUD per person, however tourist season (June-August) can get very busy, so plan ahead.

6. Ryans Den, VIC

Situated on the Great Ocean Walk in Victoria, Ryans Den is a small campsite overlooking uninterrupted coastline. The site has 8 sites, tank water, picnic tables, a kitchen area and toilets available for campers. The Great Ocean Road is one of the most scenic coastal drives in Australia, with stops along the way including the 12 Apostles, a natural formation of rocks set in the ocean.

The views from Ryans Den are amazing, but the site can get windy so bring a jacket. You will need to book, register and pay through Parks Victoria Information Centre prior to your arrival at any campsite along the Great Ocean Road. Prices start from $24.10AUD per site per night.

ryans den, great ocean walk, great ocean road, victoria, vic, camp, beach, coast, australia
Ryans Den - image: Image: greatoceanroad.com


If you are considering a campervan holiday, check out Britz. They have a wide range of campervans from 4WD Challenger to the more luxurious Venturer. Jam packed with features from built-in kitchens to LCD tvs, you can experience the roughest most remote parts of Australia in comfort.
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Why? Beautiful natural retreats for camping.
When: Anytime
Where: NSW, NT, VIC, WA
Cost: Dependent on campervan, destination, and activities.
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