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Alexander Road, Lilydale

Home > Melbourne > Free | Outdoor | Walks
by Neil Follett (subscribe)
I'm a retired photographer living in Lilydale mainly researching and writing on Australian aviation history. Now writing more on general subjects.
Published October 20th 2021
You may need sunnies for some of these flowers
Alexander Road runs for 1.1 kms from Albert Road to Mangans Road, although 100 metres is actually North Road.

Alexander Road.
Alexander Road.

If you like seeing exotic flowers that are not common, this spring walk is for you. Blue blossom and shining scabious are two. A leopards bane is another one that looks like a daisy but is part of the sunflower family.

Blue blossom and shining scabious.
Blue blossom and shining scabious.


Leopards bane.
Leopards bane.


What from the distance looked like incredibly colourful daisies, were several varieties of the ice plant. They do give daisies a run for your money colour wise.

Ice plant.
Ice plants.


daisies
Colourful daisies.

Old favourites such as bottlebrushes and grevilleas represented native flora, as did a pittosporum or Australian laurel tree.

bottle brush
Red Bottlebrush.


Grevilleas
Grevilleas.


Pittosporum.
Pittosporum.

It is steep in parts and mostly no footpaths, so the many walkers and their canine friends need to share the road with vehicular traffic.

walkers
Steep in parts for cyclists and walkers.


Walkers with dog.
Many dogs were out with their owners.

My newly found plant identifier app on my computer identified a red flower as an opium poppy. A yellow ixia plant, a native of South Africa, was another flower I had not seen before.

opium poppy
Identified as an opium poppy.


Yellow ixia.
Yellow ixia.


Not many birds were seen but quality rather than quantity prevailed. A kookaburra silently alighted upon an overhead wire almost above my head. A galah was noticed in the distance and allowed a close approach before departing the scene.

Galah and kookaburra.
Galah and kookaburra.

Many distant views are seen from many spots and opposite Taurus Court is a large grassy open area.

View from road.
View from one of the elevated positions and the grassy park.

Many nice garden beds featured in many gardens but garden ornaments were few and far between. Two wheelbarrows were the most interesting.

Garden beds.
Three of many garden beds.


wheelbarrow garden bed.
Old wheelbarrows never die.

Jasmine bushes were smelt before being seen, but a day lily was easily seen as were some tall red hot pokers - a profusely flowering pride of madeira plants, and several tall cacti.

jasmine
Jasmine flowers.


day lily
Day lily.


Red hot pokers, pride of madeira bush and cacti.
Red hot pokers, pride of madeira bush and cacti.

A crow was observed preening in a tree until it departed, being held aloft by its magnificent wings.

crow
Crow on the move.

Some proteas and hebe plants were in flower, three different coloured iris were growing and several nasturtiums seemed to run wild in places.

Protea and hebe.
Protea and hebe.


iris
Three colours of iris.


nasturtium
nasturtium.

A locust tree with its yellow foliage and white flowers looked attractive, as did a crab apple tree also with its white flowers.

Locust tree.
Locust tree.


crab apple tree
Crab apple tree in blossom.

A silver bush convolvulus ground cover plant completed this botanical walk.

Silver convolvulus,
Silver convolvulus.

This will be a slow walk if you stop and admire every flower.

Street sign
The place to be.

Help us improve  Click here if you liked this article  38
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Why? It's a botanical experience.
When: anytime
Where: Alexander Road, Lilydale. Melway map: 38. H.5.
Cost: Free
Your Comment
The bottle brush and grevilleas are my favourites. You seem very knowledgeable about the flowers Neil, I'm guessing you have a bit of a green thumb. My gardening activities start and end with looking at the plants but I have learned what a lot more of them are since I got into photography.
by Gayle Beveridge (score: 3|9506) 38 days ago
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