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Tea Tree Gully's Drumminor Lake

Home > Adelaide > Animals and Wildlife | Cycling | Walks
by Barry Silkstone (subscribe)
I am an Australian natural history writer and photographer. My aim is to encourage people to venture outdoors and enjoy the natural beauty of our planet. Visit my blog naturallysouthaustralia.com
Published July 5th 2017
Creekside Critters
It has been rather an unseasonal start to winter and many of the critters that should be 'metaphorically' tucked up in bed are still out and about. As I walk around an imposing red gum on the edge of the lake I notice that some of the bark is about to peel off. I give it a helping hand and a sizeable gecko scrambles out of its shelter and climbs up the tree in search of a new refuge.

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Marbled gecko


I am skirting the edge of Drumminor Lake about one and half kilometres from Tea Tree Plaza along the Dry Creek trail; heading away from the city. Well provisioned with some excellent bakery goodies from the Plaza I have walked to the lake while enjoying the wealth of wildlife that lives in the trees that line this north-eastern waterway.

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Drumminor Lake in the late afternoon


There are galahs and sulphur-crested cockatoos in the tops of the trees and two enthusiastic rainbow lorikeets are examining a potential nesting hole even though mating season is well behind them. Real estate for next year perhaps or maybe the weather has triggered some kind of breeding instinct.

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Rainbow lorikeets


Drumminor Lake is part of the council's water quality program and is a source of permanent water in mid-summer when Dry Creek can more than live up to its name. The title comes from the nearby Georgian styled manor which has been a restaurant and is now part of a funeral home. The lake is a favourite fishing, picnic and wildlife spot for locals and it provides a haven for water birds including waterfowl, herons and even the odd pelican.

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Swamp hen, coot and duck on the lake


Diverse native plantings along the trail means that something is always in bloom from winter flowering species of wattle to late blooming eucalypts which makes a walk or bike ride along this section of Dry Creek a worthwhile excursion at any time of the year.

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Blossoms and seed pods provide food for wildlife throughout the year


Footnote: this destination is well suited for seniors and families as it provides a safe not too strenuous conditions with some wheelchair accessibility.
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Why? A charming suburban walk with ots of wildlife
Where: Tea Tree Gully near Modbury
Cost: None
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